2 KASA This Morning – Monday, February 17th

February 17th, 2014 at 4:50 am by under 2 KASA This Morning

Question of the Day

  • Do you donate time, money or items?  If so, how often?

Tweet @2kasafox or go to Facebook to tell us.

Community Calendar

Register NOW for spring break fun at the ABQ Biopark.

For more community events»

Deal of the Day

Discount tickets to see One Republic and The Script!

Job of the Day

If you like kids and parties, our Job of the Day is for you.

Links

Adoptable pet from Animal Humane

Goodwill: http://www.goodwill.org/

Chili’s: www.chilis.com

Roadrunner Food Bank: http://www.rrfb.org/

Lobos Love Pink: http://www.golobos.com/

Boot Top Purses: http://abqleather.com/

MOMMY MCGYVER BLOG:

Rear-facing only

Are used for infants up to 22 to 40 pounds, depending on the model.

Are small and have carrying handles (and sometimes come as part of a stroller system).

Usually come with a base that can be left in the car. The seat clicks into and out of the base so you don’t have to install the seat each time you use it. Parents can buy more than one base for additional vehicles.

Are used only for travel (not for sleeping, feeding, or other uses outside the vehicle).

Convertible seats (used rear-facing)

Can be used rear-facing, then “converted” to forward-facing for older children. This means the seat can be used longer by your child. They are bulkier than infant seats, however, and do not come with carrying handles or separate bases.

Many have higher rear-facing weight (up to 40–50 pounds) and height limits than rear-facing only seats, which make them ideal for bigger babies.

Have a 5-point harness that attaches at the shoulders, at the hips, and between the legs. Convertible car seats with overhead shields are no longer made. However, if you have one you can use it safely until its expiration date.

3-in-1 seats (used rear-facing)

Can be used rear-facing, forward-facing, or as a belt-positioning booster. This means the seat may be used longer by your child.

Are often bigger in size, so it is important to check that they fit in the vehicle while rear-facing.

Do not have the convenience of a carrying handle or a separate base; however, they may have higher rear-facing weight (up to 40–45 pounds) and height limits than rear-facing only seats, which make them ideal for bigger babies.

If your child is NOT riding in a booster seat, try this 5-step test:

1.    Does the child sit all the way back against the vehicle seat?

2.    Do the child’s knees bend comfortably at the edge of the vehicle seat?

3.    Is the lap belt below the tummy, touching the thighs?

4.    Is the shoulder belt centered on the shoulder and chest?

5.    Can the child stay seated like this for the entire trip?

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